by John Connolly

The Book of Lost Things is the story of a young boy named David growing up in London on the brink of the second World War. The story begins with the loss of David’s mother and the struggle he has with his father falling for a nurse named Rose. After a while of dating, Rose becomes pregnant, driving David’s father to marry her. To escape the war David and his father move into Rose’s family home in the country.

Once at Rose’s, David begins to experience strange things, beginning with hearing the books in his room talk. Soon he begins to have black outs, during which he sees glimpses of another world. One night he hears his dead mother’s voice calling to him from a hole in the garden wall. As he is investigating the hole, a fighter jet comes hurtling towards the garden. Just as the jet crashes into the ground, David crawls in through the hole in the wall.

David comes out on the other side through a hole in a tree that enters into the world that he had seen when he would black out. The first person he meets is a woodsman who tells David not only of the horrors of the land, but also about a king who owns a book called the The Book of Lost Things that just might be able to get David back home. So, the two set out to find the king. On the way David grows from a scared, naive boy to a young man who realizes what it really means to care for someone and that life isn’t always fair, but that doesn’t mean that you can blame those around you for it.

The Book of Lost Things is a beautifully written book with fairy tales woven perfectly throughout it. John Connolly is a master story teller whose characters are wonderfully written, each with their own number of vices as well as their virtues. I like that David begins as a bit of a brat, even if he has his reasons. I also like that he acknowledges his flaws and eventually learns from them. I like that there are no true villains and no true heroes, for even the heroes have their pitfalls. I loved the characterization of Rumpelstiltskin, or, in this realm, the Crooked Man. I loved his mythos and I loved his motives. I loved that he was simply a creature trying to survive, even if it was in such a horrible way.

I loved Connolly’s integration of fairy tales, and especially the way that the children’s understanding of the stories changed the world. I also loved that Connolly’s changes to certain fairy tales had their reasons, he didn’t just change them for the hell of it. As well, I loved Connolly’s voice through out the book. He pulled off that fairy tale voice without going over the top or getting to that point of the “okay, we get it” feeling. The part that I really appreciated, though (and this might just be a nerdy thing specific to my obsessive interest in fairy tales and folk tales), was the inclusion in the back of the book of the origins of the fairy tales and what each fairy tale’s presence represents.

The Book of Lost Things is a wonderfully written story and an exciting read, which was a nice change of pace from the more real-life style books that I have been reading as of late. I actually got to a point where I couldn’t read it during my lunch anymore because I knew I wouldn’t be able to stop once I started. This is definitely one of those books that left me wondering why more people haven’t heard of it. So my recommendation is to read it and if you’ve already read it then recommend it to your friends, your family, your neighbors, your coworkers, the person sitting next to you on the bus, whoever you can. I want this book to be as popular as Twilight! Lord knows, we need some actual literature to seep its way throughout society’s kindles/bookshelves/library cards.